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If someone's ever accused you of sounding less intelligent because you swear too much, don't worry - science has got your back. A 2015 study found that those who have a healthy repertoire of curse words at their disposal are more likely to have a ric

Tesla is facing an investigation by Californian safety regulators into reports of serious injuries at its factory in Fremont, California, where it is struggling to scale up production of its Model 3 mass-market electric car.

Closing the gender gap in physics will take hundreds of years, given the current rate of progress.That's the finding of research analysing the names of authors listed on millions of scientific papers. Physics, computer science, maths and chemistry had the fewest women, while nursing and midwifery had the most.

The US space agency's Tess satellite has launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida on a mission to find thousands of new worlds beyond our Solar System. The mission will survey a great swathe of stars, hoping to catch the dips in brightness that occur when orbiting planets traverse their faces.

Firm struggles to hit targets for mass-market electric car after reeling from excessive automation and mounting pressure. Tesla has temporarily suspended its Model 3 assembly line as Elon Musk’s electric car firm struggles to deliver on targets.

A type of plankton described as part of "the beating heart" of the oceans has been named after the BBC's Blue Planet series. The tiny plant-like organism is regarded as a key element of the marine ecosystem. Scientists at University College London (UCL) bestowed the honour on Sir David Attenborough and the documentary team. It's believed to be the first time a species has been named after a television programme.

The breakthrough, spurred by the discovery of plastic-eating bugs at a Japanese dump, could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis

Tesla Inc will be profitable in the third and fourth quarters of this year and will not have to raise any money from investors, billionaire Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Friday, driving shares in the electric carmaker higher.

A court in Moscow has approved a request from the Russian media regulator to block the Telegram messaging app immediately. The media regulator sought to block the app because the firm had refused to hand over encryption keys used to scramble messages. Security officials say they need to monitor potential terrorists. But the company said the way the service was built meant it had no access to customers' encryption keys.

A new, hard-fought international deal will set limits on greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping for the first time. Delegates to the United Nations’ International Maritime Organization, or IMO, met for a week in London to hash out the details of the plan.

In the summer of 1935, the physicists Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger engaged in a rich, multifaceted and sometimes fretful correspondence about the implications of the new theory of quantum mechanics.

Tesla Inc is targeting November 2019 as the start of production for its Model Y sport utility vehicle, with production in China to begin two years later, two sources told Reuters this week, shedding some light on the electric vehicle maker's next project that could tax its resources and capacity.

Zuckerberg got rougher treatment from the House of Representatives than he did from the Senate. While yesterday Zuckerberg was largely able to stick to his script, some of the representatives today pressed hard for information on Facebook’s extensive tracking of users across the internet.

Reaction Engines Limited (REL), the UK company developing a revolutionary aerospace engine, has announced investments from both Boeing and Rolls-Royce. REL, based at Culham in Oxfordshire, is working on a propulsion system that is part jet engine, part rocket engine.

MIT researchers have invented a new computer interface that's totally hands-free and voice-free, but it doesn't read your brain waves either. Instead it relies on something called subvocalisation, or silent speech - the name for what you're doing whe

We can demonstrate, suggest, and convince ourselves that a scientific truth is valid. But proof? That's an impossibility for science.

There's a surprising amount of order in this chaotic Universe of ours, but this is a pretty weird one - astronomers have found that all galaxies, regardless of their size, take around one billion years to complete a full rotation.

An emerging field that has generated a wide range of interest, spin caloritronics, is an offshoot of spintronics that explores how heat currents transport electron spin. Spin caloritronics researchers are particularly interested in how waste heat could be used to power next-generation spintronic devices. Some of these potential devices range from ultrafast computers that need next to no power, to magnetic nanoparticles that deliver drugs to cells.

Artificial intelligence does the funniest things. A new crowd-sourced list tells the times when AI did the unexpected

Of all of the brain's functions, it's probably fair to say its ability to produce consciousness is the most challenging for us to make sense of.To better understand how our grey matter accomplishes this perplexing task, researchers from the University of Michigan's Center for Consciousness Science have taken a closer look at what the brain is doing when it's drifting into unconsciousness.

Scientists observe a signature on the sky from the very first stars to shine in the Universe.They did it with the aid of a small radio telescope in the Australian outback that was tuned to detect the earliest ever evidence for hydrogen. This hydrogen was in a state that could only be explained if it had been touched by the intense light of stars.

Early plants made Earth muddier. Ancient riverbed deposits of mud rock — rocks containing bits of clay and silt smaller than grains of sand — began increasing around 458 million years ago, around the time that rootless plants became common across Earth, researchers say.

In recent years, scientists have been uncovering potential therapeutic benefits of psychedelic substances like psilocybin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) - it looks like they can 'reset' the brain in people with mental health conditions.

A new understanding of why synthetic 2-D materials often perform orders of magnitude worse than predicted was reached by teams of researchers led by Penn State. They searched for ways to improve these materials' performance in future electronics, photonics, and memory storage applications.

Earth microbes have shown they can withstand the environment on Enceladus. If alien life is similar, the methane we’ve found on Saturn’s moon could be from life

String theorists lament the death of Joe Polchinski, one of their field’s most esteemed and respected thinkers.

Vietnam's tech economy is experiencing an innovation renaissance, with the return of overseas nationals injecting fresh ideas and a new energy.

Interest in Enceladus as a potential host for alien life likely to intensify as tests show Earth bacteria thrive in similar conditions.Deep-sea bacteria thrive in conditions designed to closely match those on Saturn’s tiny moon, Enceladus, according to scientists investigating the potential for alien life forms to survive there.

Bee viruses have been found in hoverflies for the first time, raising new concerns about disease threats.The brightly-coloured flies may be picking up bee viruses as they forage at the same flowers. And scientists think hoverflies could then be spreading the deadly infections long distances when they migrate.

The leaflet inside a packet of contraceptive pills lists side effects women might experience, including breast pain, migraines or headaches, stomach problems, and acne. It also says you might experience changes in mood, and depression.

Engineers are taking a counterintuitive approach to protecting future spacecraft: Shooting at their experiments. The image above and high-speed video below capture a 2.8-millimeter aluminum bullet plowing through a test material for a space shield at 7 kilometers per second. The work is an effort to find structures that could stand up to the impact of space debris.

For people with an anxiety disorder, everyday tasks can seem impossible.In its worst form, anxiety can cause trouble sleeping, heart palpitations, or the inability to leave the house.

Tap — gently — the plump rear of a young Nessus sphinx hawk moth, and you may hear the closest sound yet discovered to a caterpillar voice. Caterpillars don’t breathe through their mouths. Yet a Nessus sphinx hawk moth, if disturbed, will emit from its open mouth a sustained hiss followed by a string of scratchy burplike sounds. “Hard to describe,” says animal behaviorist Jayne Yack of Carleton University in Ottawa, who urges people just to listen to it for themselves.

Climate change could drive most of the birds' global population from their current nesting islands.The scientists have assessed the birds' fragmented population in the Southern Ocean and concluded that some island strongholds will become unsustainable.

ABD'de yapılan yeni araştırma, çiftlerin el ele tutuşarak birbirlerinin fiziksel acılarını azaltabildiğini ortaya koydu. Araştırmaya göre sevdiğimiz kişinin elini tutmak, deriye bastırılan sıcak bir metal parçasının vereceği acıyı uyuşturabilecek kadar etkili.

The European Union is preparing legislation to force companies to turn over customers' personal data when requested even if it is stored on servers outside the bloc, a position that will put Europe at loggerheads with tech giants and privacy campaigners.

What is inside an atom between the nucleus and the electron? Usually there is nothing, but why could there not be other particles too? If the electron orbits the nucleus at a great distance, there is plenty of space in between for other atoms. A "giant atom" could be created, filled with ordinary atoms. All these atoms form a weak bond, creating a new, exotic state of matter at cold temperatures, referred to as Rydberg polarons.

The headline was that an ancient Briton from 10,000 years ago had dark skin, but the genetics of skin colour are so complex that we can’t be sure

An amateur astronomer has caught a supernova explosion on camera.

The 40 highest-paying jobs you can get without a bachelor's degree. You don't need a four-year degree to make bank.

The networks' failure to tackle cyber-bullying is damaging youngsters' mental health, a survey finds.

It's another demonstration of the power of Big Data - of mining a huge batch of statistics to see patterns of behaviour that were simply not apparent before.Satellite tracking shows fishing's footprint on Earth is now over four times that of agriculture.

One photon can transmit information in two directions at once.Communication is a two-way street. Thanks to quantum mechanics, that adage applies even if you’ve got only one particle to transmit messages with.

SpaceX turned heads around the world on February 6 with the first-ever launch of Falcon Heavy.The 230-foot-tall (70 metres tall) rocket's three boosters helped push Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster into space, peeled off after running low on fuel, and then careened toward Earth.

Fishing has left a hefty footprint on Earth. Oceans cover more than two-thirds of the planet’s surface, and industrial fishing occurred across 55 percent of that ocean area in 2016, researchers report in the Feb. 23 Science. In comparison, only 34 percent of Earth’s land area is used for agriculture or grazing.

The history of medicine is studded with tales of self-experimentation.In 1961, Victor Herbert deprived himself of folic acid for weeks (he basically boiled his food to deplete its nutritional value), ultimately learning the hard way that it's a key part of the diet.

Facing a future in which self-driving cars may curb vehicle ownership, Nissan Motor Co is taking its first steps to becoming an operator of autonomous transportation services, hoping to break into a segment set to be dominated by Uber Technologies and other technology firms.

Accommodation site will offer a separate section for boutique as it seeks a slice of the luxury travel market.The accommodation site will offer a dedicated section for boutique hotels, bed and breakfasts and more unusual locations such as treehouses and boats.

Users rebel against social media app’s new features while celebrities including Kylie Jenner dump platform as it tries to appeal to new users. Snapchat has said its redesign is here to stay, in spite of a petition from more than 1.2 million users begging the company to reconsider and celebrities such as Kylie Jenner abandoning the platform.

“There’s a very faint dimple here,” Sterling Nesbitt says, holding up a palm-sized fossil to the light. The fossil, a pelvic bone, belonged to a creature called Teleocrater rhadinus. The slender, 2-meter-long reptile ran on all fours and lived 245 million years ago, about 10 million to 15 million years before scientists think dinosaurs first appeared.

A seminal event in the Earth's history - when plants appeared on land - may have happened 100 million years earlier than previously thought. Land plants evolved from "pond scum" about 500 million years ago, according to new research. These early moss-like plants greened the continents, creating habitats for land animals.

Some of the biggest electronics bazaars in Asia are being flooded with customers looking for the latest piece of technology: cryptocurrency mining rigs.Scores of miners from around the world are traveling to places like Hong Kong’s Sham Shui Po and Singapore’s Sim Lim Square to buy the rigs, which the shops’ hardware geeks expertly build behind counters in their cramped boutiques.

Cape Town has postponed the date on which it would run out of water - again. After three years of persistent drought, the government has warned that the coastal city would be forced to turn off most of its taps in 2018 - a date also known as "Day Zero".

For the first time, researchers used human cells to build a model of the surface of the eye that’s equipped with a fake eyelid that mimics blinking. This synthetic eye could be used to study and test treatments for eye diseases, researchers reported February 16 in a news conference at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Study finds that turbulence competes in fusion plasmas to rapidly respond to temperature perturbations.

The inaugural group of 49 students is 57 percent women and includes citizens of 20 countries pursuing degrees in 28 Stanford graduate departments.

For centuries, the pyramids of Giza have puzzled researchers - not just their mysterious voids and hidden chambers, but exactly how ancient Egyptians built such impressive structures without modern technology.

Scientists have warned for decades that the overuse of antibiotics leads to the development of drug-resistant bacteria, making it harder to fight infectious disease.

Researchers have achieved a new kind of chimeric first, producing sheep-human hybrid embryos that could one day represent the future of organ donation – by using body parts grown inside unnatural, engineered animals.

Still nibbling Valentine's Day goodies? Munching packaged cereals, pancakes or muffins for breakfast? Enjoying a lunch of processed meats and bread, sweetened pasta sauce, or even a salad drenched in dressing?

Everyone knows that water freezes at 0 degrees C. Life on Earth would be vastly different if this were not so. However, water's cousin, silica, exhibits wayward behavior when cooled that has long puzzled scientists.

Recent near misses show China's pursuit of space prowess seems to trump debris risks. The re-entry of its space station is another looming drama, says Paul Marks

Scientists have found predictable patterns in the way our genetic machinery winds down after death.

Noise from ships may disturb harbor porpoises enough to keep them from getting the food they need.Harbor porpoises are frequently exposed to sounds from shipping vessels that register at around 100 decibels, about as loud as a lawnmower, scientists report February 14 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Sounds this loud can cause porpoises to stop echolocation, which they use to catch food.

They say money can't buy happiness, but let's be honest, they say a lot of things – and they're not always right.When it comes to income, scientists say there actually is an ideal yearly amount we can earn to feel emotionally content and satisfied – and believe it or not, if you have too much money, you may actually start creeping back into unhappy territory.

One of Walmart Inc's best chances at taking on Amazon.com Inc in e-commerce lies with six giant server farms, each larger than ten football fields.These facilities, which cost Walmart millions of dollars and took nearly five years to build, are starting to pay off. The retailer’s online sales have been on a tear for the last three consecutive quarters, far outpacing wider industry growth levels.

It’s the wifi speaker to beat in terms of audio but being locked in to Apple services is frustrating and its voice assistant is lacking. After much anticipation, and speculation that Apple has missed the boat and handed victory to Amazon’s champion Echo, the HomePod smart speaker is finally here.

Cells continue to function even after an individual dies, a discovery that could be developed into a forensic tool.Analysing post-mortem samples, an international team of scientists showed that some genes became more active after death.

Uber and Waymo have reached a settlement over claims Uber stole trade secrets from the self-driving company. As part of the agreement, Uber is giving a 0.34% Uber stake to Waymo, worth approximately $245m (£177m). Uber has also agreed not to use Waymo's technology in its self-driving cars, though it maintains it never did.

For the first time, scientists have successfully taken human eggs from their earliest stages to maturity in a lab setting.This accomplishment is set to give us new insight into how human eggs develop, and it could potentially offer a compelling new option to individuals who are at risk of fertility loss.

A new spending package could lead to U.S. science agencies getting a bump in funding.A two-year spending package, passed by Congress in the wee hours of February 9 and signed into law by President Trump hours later, could add to the coffers of U.S. science agencies.

Lately, broccoli has been gaining a reputation as an excellent vegetable due to its high levels of a particularly beneficial compound called sulforaphane.With some early-stage studies showing how this compound plays a role in blood sugar control and potentially even has anti-cancer benefits, it's no wonder that broccoli pills are on the rise.

Readers had questions about a supernova that continuously erupts, the difference between dark energy and dark matter, and more.Supernova iPTF14hls has erupted continually since its discovery in 2014, fluctuating in brightness at least five times.

Lawyers for self-driving car company Waymo play clip from Wall Street in court, as Travis Kalanick is accused of stealing rival’s ideas. A scene from the 1987 movie Wall Street became a flashpoint in the trial in which Google’s driverless car spinoff Waymo accuses the ride-hailing company Uber of stealing trade secrets.

South Korea and Sweden are the most innovative countries in the world, according to a league table covering everything from the concentration of tech companies to the number of science and engineering graduates. The index on innovative countries highlights South Korea’s position as the economy whose companies filed the most patents in 2017.

Amazon.com Inc's shares surged on Friday, pushing its stock market value above $700 billion and threatening to eclipse Microsoft Corp, a day after the online retailing behemoth reported blockbuster results.

Sony's chief executive Kazuo Hirai is stepping down and handing the reins over to finance chief Kenichiro Yoshida. Mr Yoshida, Sony's chief financial officer, is to take over control of the Japanese electronics giant from 1 April. Mr Hirai will remain at Sony as chairman. Mr Yoshida and Mr Hirai have been instrumental in turning Sony around to focus on smartphone image sensors.

Ford; sürücüsüz otomobillerin yükselişine, taksi uygulamalarına ve artan kent nüfusuna ayak uydurulması ve bu doğrultuda büyük şehirlerin dönüşümden geçirilmesi için bir çağrı yaptı. Aksi...

In a hugely detailed and comprehensive new study, researchers have painted a picture of how around a tenth of Earth's surface suddenly became covered in roaring fires at a point some 12,800 years ago.

Researchers using a high-tech aerial mapping technique have found tens of thousands of previously undetected Mayan houses, buildings, defense works and pyramids in the dense jungle of Guatemala's Peten region, suggesting that millions more people lived there than previously thought.

As black holes evaporate, they release particles that may carry more information than we thought, so black holes may not break the laws of physics after all

A coffee-table book explores how humans have tried to understand death through the ages.

BBC Click's Lara Lewington looks at some of the best technology stories of the week.

On 13 January, the state of Hawaii spent 38 minutes in terror after a text alert mistakenly warned of an incoming nuclear missile attack.If you heard about the mistake and wondered what you would or should do if you learned a nuclear bomb was heading your way, you're not alone.

Apple Inc's hint of returning a ton of cash to shareholders was not enough to move investors who worried more about the iPhone maker's weak outlook amid reports of production cuts for its flagship iPhone X.

Here are 11 reasons why criminals are increasingly trying to steal cryptocurrencies rather than data and classic, fiat currencies.Over the past month, criminals have successfully stolen significant amounts of cryptocurrency, making international news headlines on multiple occasions.

Advances in AI and robotics are leading to high street models becoming increasingly useful in our day-to-day lives.Named after the Greek god of the wind, this bot’s abilities are more prosaic yet nevertheless useful.

One of the oldest and most fundamental questions in biochemistry is why the 20 amino acids that support life are all needed, when the original core of 13 would do – and quantum chemistry might have just provided us with the answer.

Movies and other media are full of mixed messages about the risks and rewards of building machines with minds of their own. For every manipulative automaton like Ex Machina’s Ava (SN: 5/16/15, p. 26), there’s a helpful Star Wars droid. And while some tech titans such as Elon Musk warn of the threats artificial intelligence presents, others, including Mark Zuckerberg, dismiss the doomsayers.

Two women carrying mutations that cause rare genetic disease to undergo radical therapy. Doctors in Newcastle have been granted permission to create Britain’s first “three-person babies” for two women who are at risk of passing on devastating and incurable genetic diseases to their children.